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Document Typology: Research
Methodology addressed by the publication:International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
Title of document: Lithuanian health strategy-information society
Name of author(s): A. Appels, H. Bosma, V. Grabauskas, A. Gostautas,
Name of publisher: Health economic center
Language of the publication: English
Language of the review: English
Summary:
This project is about mortality according to education level and occupational class from census-based mortality studies. Deaths were classified according to cause, including common causes, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer; causes related to smoking; causes related to alcohol use; and causes amenable to medical intervention, such as tuberculosis and hypertension. Data on self-assessed health, smoking, and obesity according to education and income were obtained from health or multipurpose surveys. For each country, the association between socioeconomic status and health outcomes was measured with the use of regression-based inequality indexes.
Reviewer's comments on the document:
We observed variation across Europe in the magnitude of inequalities in health associated with socioeconomic status.
These inequalities might be reduced by improving educational opportunities, income distribution, health-related behavior, or access to health careIn almost all countries, the rates of death and poorer self-assessments of health were substantially higher in groups of lower socioeconomic status, but the magnitude of the inequalities between groups of higher and lower socioeconomic status was much larger in some countries than in others. Inequalities in mortality were small in some southern European countries and very large in most countries in the eastern and Baltic regions. These variations among countries appeared to be attributable in part to causes of death related to smoking or alcohol use or amenable to medical intervention. The magnitude of inequalities in self-assessed health also varied substantially among countries, but in a different pattern.
Where to find it: www.healtheconom.lt

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