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Document Typology: Web Article
Methodology addressed by the publication:Parents pedagogy
Title of document: health care policy
Name of author(s): Laura Hatfield
Name of publisher: Harvard Medical School
Language of the publication: English
Language of the review: English
Summary:
Health care work is motivated by author recent development of joint models for longitudinal patient-reported outcomes and survival in oncology clinical trials. There are many settings in which multiple outcomes are collected to monitor the progress of a single underlying health process. The question arises whether utilizing multiple outcome types in a joint model is preferable to the simpler approach of considering each outcome separately. Dr. Hatfield's current research in this area investigates the potential for learning about model parameters and the informativeness of various data sources.The goal of this article is to address, from the perspective of users of the health care system (consumers), the following questions: What are the most important health care quality gaps and/or challenges; what major changes should we anticipate in this area in the near future; and what should be the role of federal and state agencies, accreditation organizations, and philanthropic foundations in addressing these challenges?
Reviewer's comments on the document:
We discuss the needs, challenges, and potential action steps for increasing the prominence of the user's perspective in 3 areas: (1) the conceptualization and definition of quality; (2) the measurement of quality; and (3) routine quality assessment and improvement. The article concludes by making recommendations about the role that different agencies and organizations can and should play in meeting these challenges.Over the last two years we have tried to encourage the community of medical informatics professionals and researchers from Central and Eastern European countries to undertake these challenges and join European activities in the field of e-health. We are aware of the fact that only common standards and procedures will enable full integration of this region with the main stream of Information Society developments, currently accelerating all over Europe. This book also reports on the results of cooperation between researchers and centres representing both new EU entrants and those countries, that have been part of the Community for a long time. The European Commission has consistently fostered the strategy of e-health development over the past decades. Yet, the economic transformation underway in Central and Eastern European countries does not favour rapid development in this domain. Healthcare systems all over the region are being transformed in search of more effective mechanisms of financing. One of the main motivations for publishing this book is to exchange ideas and share experience which can speed up e-health services development in Central and Eastern countries. Transfer of knowledge and technology is surely one of the key mechanisms through which these new EU member states can integrate themselves with the Community.
Where to find it:

http://www.health policy/54netdistryb.hotyu

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