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Document Typology: Research
Methodology addressed by the publication:Narrative medicine
Title of document: Being present: The role of narrative medicine in reducing the unequal burden of pain
Name of author(s): Green, Carmen R., University of Michigan Health System, University Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, US, carmeng@med.umich.edu
Name of publisher: Netherlands: Elsevier Science.
Language of the publication: English
Language of the review: English
Summary:
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies' report, Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Healthcare, concluded that racial and ethnic health care disparities (ie, the difference in health, disease burden, or clinical decisions or outcomes associated with disadvantage) existed and were unacceptable. They further concluded that health system, health care provider, and patient factors, as well as bias, stereotyping, and prejudice contributed to health care disparities within an historical and contemporary context that includes persistent racial and ethnic discrimination. In the health care arena verbal and nonverbal communication, the process of sending and receiving information, is critically important to ensuring quality pain care. However, even under the best of circumstances, health care provider–patient communication can be fraught with misunderstandings and misinterpretations affecting both patient and health care provider behavior and decision-making. Of course, two critical and rate-limiting steps to understanding disparities may be the health care provider's willingness to hear the patient's story and the patient’s willingness to tell their story. Thus, narrative medicine provides a novel vehicle to reduce and eliminate health care disparities, while promoting inclusion and equity for racial and ethnic minorities and other special populations. First, health care providers must strive to understand themselves in order to read the patient's words, hear their voice, and see life through their eyes. Second, health care providers must actively (not passively) listen to the patient's story, using thoughtful clarifying questions with minimal interruptions to the extent possible. Narrative medicine allows health care providers the opportunity to actively listen, feel, and be present. Narrative medicine also allows the patient to be heard, begin healing, and may be just what we need to reduce the unequal burden of pain and improve the quality of pain care for all. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved)
Reviewer's comments on the document:
Health care providers must strive to understand themselves in order to read the patient's words, hear their voice, and see life through their eyes. Second, health care providers must actively (not passively) listen to the patient's story, using thoughtful clarifying questions with minimal interruptions to the extent possible
Where to find it: PsycINFO Database Record http://web.ebscohost.com.offcampus.dam.unito.it/ehost/detail?vid=4&hid=111&sid=039662d8-d637-4520-b895-59b305c5b495%40sessionmgr110&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=psyh&AN=2011-08156-005

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