Lifelong Learning Programme

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This material reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein

Also available in:

Databases

Homepage > Databases > Publications

Publications

back to the list

Document Typology: Research
Methodology addressed by the publication:Narrative medicine
Title of document: The narrative approach to pain.
Name of author(s): Spiro, Howard M., Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, US
Name of publisher: Biobehavioral approaches to pain. Moore, Rhonda J. (Ed.); pp. 85-93. New York, NY, US: Springer Science + Business Media, 2009. xxxi, 568 pp.
Language of the publication: English
Language of the review: English
Summary:
Narrative—framing the patient's story as important—has become attractive to medical practitioners who worry about the growing dominance of "images" in medical diagnosis. "Images" has proven to be the right term for the x-ray/ computer generated illustrations which call up the reverence of icons begun in the Byzantine Empire. What patients have to say—how they feel—gets less attention from physicians than the images of their organs. Physicians are so pressed for time that they quickly interrupt their patients, to give the impression they are not listening. And often, they are not! Aggrieved, many patients have turned to alternative practitioners who show more interest in people than in their parts, and who spend more time than mainstream physicians in discussing how their patients feel, and what they want. Oncologists are well acquainted with the pathos of patients' stories, for they deal with primal issues daily, sharing the suffering of patients fighting cancer. This brief commentary is intended to be an account of what the author thinks about narrative medicine. Narrative medicine acts as a supplement, a stimulant one hopes, to quantitative technical approaches to frightened human beings. Narrative provides a powerful counter-influence to evidence-based medicine in our medical schools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Reviewer's comments on the document:
This brief commentary is intended to be an account of what the author thinks about narrative medicine. Narrative medicine acts as a supplement, a stimulant one hopes, to quantitative technical approaches to frightened human beings. Narrative provides a powerful counter-influence to evidence-based medicine in our medical schools.
Where to find it: PsycINFO Database Record http://web.ebscohost.com.offcampus.dam.unito.it/ehost/detail?vid=5&hid=111&sid=039662d8-d637-4520-b895-59b305c5b495%40sessionmgr110&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=psyh&AN=2008-02299-005

back to the list