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Document Typology: Research
Methodology addressed by the publication:Narrative medicine
Title of document: Sharing stories: Narrative medicine in an evidence-based world.
Name of author(s): Hatem, David, Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, US, hatemd@ummhc.org Rider, Elizabeth A., Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, US, elizabeth
Name of publisher: Netherlands: Elsevier Science.
Language of the publication: English
Language of the review: English
Summary:
Our lives are made up of stories. Stories have a direction and draw the reader into the mystery of what will happen next. Some of our earliest memories are of stories told to us at the end of the day by parents and loved ones. The practice of medicine is lived in stories. But stories do more than facilitate conversation. Narrative probes the depths of medical experience, and allows for greater understanding of patients and work. Stories, for the writer, and often for the reader, can be the work of meaning, and even creation. This allows for great possibilities. To do its work, writing creates and recreates the past in the present moment. In this way, writing and narrative can be seen as an act of being, paying attention and capturing details of the present moment. Writing narrative is, simultaneously, an act of observing, of becoming, of predicting, and of making choices about how one might act differently or re-write the story, our part or that of others. Yet stories have an uncertain place in the world of medicine. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Reviewer's comments on the document:
Writing narrative is, simultaneously, an act of observing, of becoming, of predicting, and of making choices about how one might act differently or re-write the story, our part or that of others. Yet stories have an uncertain place in the world of medicine
Where to find it: PsycINFO Database Record http://web.ebscohost.com.offcampus.dam.unito.it/ehost/detail?vid=5&hid=111&sid=039662d8-d637-4520-b895-59b305c5b495%40sessionmgr110&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=psyh&AN=2004-18625-002

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