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Personal Experience

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Sense of protection

Sonia
Language: English
Country: Italy
Typology: health care professionals
Text:
My story will describe my experience on a hospitalization of my mother. My mom was 75 years old, it was August and I was on vacation. My father called me on the phone telling me that my mother was not well, I was more than 400 km away and I got a little upset because, once again indirectly and unconsciously, my father was asking me what to do and how to decide. I told him to take her to hospital if it was necessary. On my return home, I still find my mom, she did not want to go to the hospital. In the end, I decided to take her to the emergency room: then she had been hospitalized for an outbreak of pneumonia and mild renal insufficiency. After a few days in the emergency room, she has been moved in the Department of General Medicine. My mother responded quite well to treatment except for her allergies to multiple antibiotics. My father was very afraid for this hospitalization, the typology of department put him in anxiety for my mother, so much so that the doctors talked with me and my brother pointing out the excessive and unnecessary anguish of my father was not sensible because the picture of my mother was not serious and he was improving. In addition to the illness of my mother, I had to also handle anxiety well known to me of my father, not able to take charge of the fact that his wife was ill and then pour it on me, daughter. The staff was friendly, but the room I was in my mother (of four) was worse than you can even imagine in a beam of Psychiatry. I spent a night in the ward and I realized that night many things about being sick and nursing profession. I teach nurses and that night took a lot of new notes. In the room with my mom, there were two patients who were applicants and very troubling. That night the two carers had to manage an entire department. A patient rang the bell all night, insistently, without specific reasons: the nurses arrived and tried to reassure her. The patient complained, screamed, even if she had no reason at all; other patients could not sleep, and she had an argument with another patient. The nurses could not do anything else, there was no way to reassure the woman who clearly wanted attention beyond measure. This situation put in excitement not only the room in which there was my mother, but also the entire department: it was a continuous ringing of bells, and also the patient had begun to cry with a loud voice to draw attention of the operators. I watched all night, sitting in my chair next to the bed of my mother. I could not think of leaving my mother alone on that room, shooting me a sense of protection never heard before. During an argument between the patient and the nurses, I found myself standing next to my mother's bed, as if I were a shield, to protect her. The patient does not calmed down for the whole night. In the morning, before I go, I greeted the staff of the night, and, in the meantime, I was wondering what to say to my student nurses about how to act when you find yourself in front of a complex patient: I was confused, different theories and consolidated practices were severely put to the test.


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